Hand built traditionally styled, gaffed-rigged boats of distinction

Subtitle

Kittiwake 16

An ideal camping dayboat, with the performance of an old fashioned racer. Nice and sturdy, very stable and yet fast and manoeuvrable.

The Kittiwake 16 is the latest in the Kittiwake range, nicely filling the gap between the 14 and the 20.

The GRP simulated-clinker hull has the lines of a 1930's racing hull from the Solent.

There are two versions of interior fitout. 

One is three-quarter decked in epoxy-sheathed ply, leaving a very roomy yet secure cockpit in the middle.

The cockpit has a flat floor with slatted floorboards, and can easily sleep two adults.

The forward parts of the floor lift up to seat height, to make two comfortable camping berths on waterproof mattresses, in the forward half of the boat, tucked under the foredeck.

There is a pull-up cuddy on a folding frame, which forms an ideal cabin when camping, or just getting out of the weather. This can also be used whilst under sail.

The cuddy is five feet in length and five feet wide, with a big clear window giving good forward visibility. The cuddy can fold down neatly around the forward coaming.

There are buoyancy tanks running fore/aft under the side benches.

These can be converted into lockers with sealed hatches. There is also plenty of stowage space under the berths and side decks. Under the aft deck there is a handy shelf and room to stow an auxiliary petrol tank underneath.

The oars are stowed in clips under the rear side benches.

The second version is an open plan just like the Kittiwake 14 classic but on a larger scale giving much more cockpit room.

The centreplate is made of 10mm galvanised steel, and is housed inside a GRP envelope which is part of the hull moulding. This is then clad in timber to give a pleasing look.

The plate is raised and lowered by means of a bronze winch drum forward of the housing unit.

The rudder blade also hinges up and back, thus giving the boat an ability to float in just one foot of water. However when the plate is down, the boat draws five feet, giving great stability and very little leeway.

There is a very useful outboard engine bracket on the transom.

This enables the engine to raise and lower as well as tilt, making it both accesssible and out of the way when sailing and without interfering with the rudder.

The Kittiwake 16 is capable of carrying a variety of rigs - gaff, sloop, cutter or yawl.

In all cases the mainmast sits in a tabernacle allowing for singlehanded raising and lowering, and is the same length as the hull, so makes a neat package when trailing.

The sloop rig has a short bowsprit with a fairly large jib. The mainsail has an extended boom overhanging the transom.

The cutter rig has the same mainsail but a longer bowsprit and two small headsails.

The yawl keeps the two headsails, shortens the boom and adds a mizzen mast just inside the transom which overhangs the transom and is controlled via a retracting bumpkin pole.

In all cases the mainsail has two sets of reefing points, the jibs are on furling drums, and the mizzen is easily furled around the mast.

The advantage of a gaff rig is that the spars are easily handled as they are relatively short.

The sails can remain attached to the spars for the whole season so rigging takes less time. There is also a lower centre of effort and therefore less heel for the same amount of sail area.

Launching and recovery is easy on the road trailer. Designed with keel-guide rollers, winch, strap, jockey wheel, grease nipples on the hubs and no need for brakes.

The yawl keeps the two headsails, shortens the boom and adds a mizzen mast just inside the transom which overhangs the transom and is controlled via a retracting bumpkin pole.

In all cases the mainsail has two sets of reefing points, the jibs are on furling drums, and the mizzen is easily furled around the mast.

The advantage of a gaff rig is that the spars are easily handled as they are relatively short. The sails can remain attached to the spars for the whole season so rigging takes less time.

There is also a lower centre of effort and therefore less heel for the same amount of sail area.

Launching and recovery is easy on the road trailer. Designed with keel-guide rollers, winch, strap, jockey wheel, grease nipples on the hubs and no need for brakes.

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